Yes, there’s homework involved from time to time.

And to up the ante with the whole thing I was in the Lappeenranta-Imatra sector at the time, which made it significantly more difficult but fortunately our guest pen Sonja knows her way around. South Carelian marshes are a rarity of some sort and if you manage to find one, they’re usually heavily ditched which means they’re pretty much ruined. But as luck would have it, this wasn’t Sonja’s first rodeo.

So within this story I’m introducing the Hämmäauteensuo marsh, which is protected by nature preservation law. It’s also owned by the City of Lappeenranta and has a lean-to that’s oddly broken. But you can roast sausages by it. This time around the roasting was already done the previous day on Sonja’s lean-to birthday in Kangaskoski. Which was nice since the Hämmäauteensuo lean-to was packed. But this was more of an educational trip. I like to drag my friends into these things.

Bog, morass and wilderness

Hämmäauteensuo is a wooded 30 hectare marsh area.

The two marsh types dominating Hämmäauteensuo are bog and morass. Bog is an open marsh which is usually seen as such, a marsh – but morass has pine growing in it. And wilderness needs its fair share of spruces.

Honestly, I didn’t recognize all the plants I encountered but I did ask Heikki to take comprehensive photos of them! In addition to all of this I noticed cowberry, blueberry and dwarf birch. Not to mention cotton grass which is one of my favorites. The two I had to look up and confirm from my teacher were a rosling and a vaivero.

Marshes are interesting places with their eerie atmosphere. I have certain love for broadwalks and especially when you can see plants reach the horizon.

//Anne

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